Gluten free labeling and testing

Jamie Kabourek, RD, LMNT shared her knowledge on Labeling Laws. One area that requires standardization is Precautionary Labeling.  We have all seen this kind of labeling on packages, it includes statements like” may contain” or “produced in a facility that also handles or processes…”.

She advises customers to avoid these foods if your allergen is listed, but can be put on a label by the companies’ lawyer and not related to health risk.

She  brought a NIMA sensor ($289.00 plus capsule costs), a  gluten meter.  She tested two products for gluten. This meter has been used in research settings and for consumer use, but currently members had lots of questions like what part of the meal do you test?  Their lab was been testing the sensor against other validated and  analytical methods.

Jaimie shared new research from Tricia Thompson about precautionary labeling and gluten-free products from the Euro  The summary states:

In a recently published 2018 analysis (1), labeling information was retrospectively reviewed from 328 products labeled gluten-free and tested for gluten through Gluten Free Watchdog, LLC. These products all state gluten-free.

Ÿ297/328 products tested for gluten did NOT include an allergen advisory statement for wheat or gluten on product packaging. (They do list wheat in the contain statement).

Ÿ31/328 products tested for gluten DID include an allergen advisory statement for wheat or gluten on product packaging.

ŸOf the 297 products that did NOT include an advisory statement, 39 contained quantifiable gluten at or above 5 ppm, including 12 products that tested at or above 20 ppm of gluten.

Ÿ Of the 31 products that DID include an advisory statement, 3 contained quantifiable gluten at or above 5 ppm, including 2 products that tested at or above 20 ppm of gluten.

so it looks like 4-6 % of products (12/297 or 2/31) labeled gluten-free may contain gluten above the 20ppm!  The advisory statements do not offer any assistance in the safety of these products.

We also discussed the new urine and stool test, Gluten Detective. This monitors accidental exposure to gluten. Katherine Wilson from Glutenostics writes:

The stool test is much more sensitive than the urine test. The stool can pick up minor exposure over the course of days, while the urine is most useful to pick up major exposure within the last day. Many caregivers find the urine useful for children who attend school, camp, or other times the caregiver is unable to control the food or environment. However, the stool is most useful for celiac patients in that it can pick up small amounts of cross contamination.

The Gluten Dectective will be available at the Hy-Vee Pharmacy on Holdrege and 84th Street. Please call Becky Guittar for more information 402-467-5505.  Costs will be determined.

Our next meeting will be Fall 2018.  Becky also has a Survey for programming for next year.

If you would like to let us know topics for next year or other volunteer opportunities, contact Hy-Vee Dietitian Becky Guittar, 402-467-5505 or bguittar@hy-vee.com

 

 

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